Proposition 60 poses mandatory condoms in porn

By Xavier Johnson, Scene Editor

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Adult film performers and producers in California could see stronger regulation and an expansion on safe sex practices as Proposition 60 hits ballots and will be voted on Nov. 8.

Proposition 60 will require adult film performers to use condoms during filming of sexual intercourse scenes.

In addition, producers will be required to pay for testing and vaccines for performers. Producers will need to renew their  license with Cal/OSHA every two years and provide notification of all film shoots with proof of protection within thirty days before or after production.

Protection against sexually transmitted infections in adult film is already required by the Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA).

The labor code requires protection against sexually transmitted infections spreading in the workplace so employers must provide protective equipment. The code does not specifically speak on adult films or specifically require condom use. The proposition expands the requirements and enforces a condom requirement for adult films.

On a smaller scale, in Los Angeles County, condom use has been required for four years when Measure B passed in 2012. Proposition 60 would be similar to Measure B but on a statewide scale.

Production companies like Canoga Park, Calif. based Wicked Pictures are against Proposition 60. The argument is that companies like Wicked Pictures regularly test their on-screen performers for sexually transmitted infections. The use of condoms is a preference and a choice they should be allowed to make. With providing regular testing, the safety of the performers is still being maintained.

Rick Taylor, a campaign consultant for “Yes on Prop 60, For Adult Industry Responsibility,” said condoms are 97 percent effective in protecting against sexually transmitted infections. “Condoms are the most effective means to protect workers. Testing by itself is not enough to protect (performers).”

Contra Costa College sociology major Tyler Fields said he would vote no on the proposition. Fields said he thinks it should be a choice the producers are allowed to make and as long as they are testing then it’s OK.

Support for Proposition 60 has a lot of money coming from the AIDS Healthcare Foundation. A major contributor, the foundation has put more than $4 million into supporting the proposition and getting California voters to vote yes.

Money coming in against Proposition 60 is substantially less with approximately $500,000 coming from a variety of contributors like Wicked Pictures and Free Speech Coalition.

The proposition allows for anyone with a financial interest in the production to be responsible for violation of the law. Executive Director of the Free Speech Coalition Eric Paul Leue said Proposition 60 will put adult film performers at risk of being sued. Performers often have a financial stake in their work when it comes to production, he said.