Digital divides create relationship strife

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Jacqie Moody / The Advocate

By Jacqie Moody, Staff Writer

It seems more and more these days people look for the wrong ingredients to strengthen their relationship bonds. Surface beauty holds more weight than what is inside. And far too often admirers attach their affection to money or material things. And social media amplifies these misplaced priorities all too much.

Social media provides an audience to what should be personal conversations.

It opens a window to the inner-workings of an intimate connection and allows parasites to eat away at the strands that hold it together.

There was a time when relationships did not end with the passing of a season and stayed strong through tests and temptation.

Bonds were built on genuine love, trust and loyalty.

Trust still exists, but people fall victim to the illusions presented on social media by believing false ideas about themselves and the surrounding world.

Ideas work to dissect the ties that hold a couple together.

So many people claim to want to be with someone, to have a meaningful relationship.

But then use every tactic available to hide all of the electronic contacts they have with other potential romantic matches.

Interactions on social media, for instance, would make any significant other uncomfortable. But rather than limit the amount of time in life connected to social media, couples increase it.

People post every instant of their relationship on social media, allowing an open door for others to comment and sew the seeds of doubt that can chip away at any meaningful foundation that has been created.

These new aspects of communication take away from what it seems like ‘finding the one’ was supposed to be.

It takes away from that old-school love.

That is the kind of love that keeps you guessing with butterflies in your stomach, wondering if that special someone feels the same way.

This was done during a time when individuals pursued each other for their loyalty and devotion, not for what may or may not be in their pockets.

There is something that feels natural about looking into the eyes of the one you love and speaking directly from the heart.

There was no digital divide between people to jumble intentions with interpretations.

There has to be thousands of people who get caught up with their significant other every day over the random like or comment on an Instagram photo.

You cannot even feel comfortable liking a picture of yourself if the wrong person sent it.

Especially if the wrong person sent it.

There was no messaging random strangers online, people had to actually go out and talk to each other to find their one and only. People met in person and experienced things together, so stronger bonds were built.

There was more truthfulness and it was even there after the relationship ended.

It was easier to go your separate ways and remain friends, even if a connection is just not meant to be.

Now people are spiteful. After the magic is gone, they go out of their way to make their one and only feel as much pain as they felt.

Those kinds of actions are commonly fueled by conversations on social media.

Quickly a lovers’ quarrel or an intimate disagreement becomes an Internet spectacle.

This provides a momentary reality show for everybody, ending with relationship shrapnel everywhere.