Escorts reduce concerns

Police+aide+Ashley+Crandell%2C+an+administration+of+justice+major%2C+and+Evelio+Perez%2C+an+engineering+major%2C+take+a+ride+in+Lot+10+on+May+2.
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Escorts reduce concerns

Police aide Ashley Crandell, an administration of justice major, and Evelio Perez, an engineering major, take a ride in Lot 10 on May 2.

Police aide Ashley Crandell, an administration of justice major, and Evelio Perez, an engineering major, take a ride in Lot 10 on May 2.

Cody Casares / The Advocate

Police aide Ashley Crandell, an administration of justice major, and Evelio Perez, an engineering major, take a ride in Lot 10 on May 2.

Cody Casares / The Advocate

Cody Casares / The Advocate

Police aide Ashley Crandell, an administration of justice major, and Evelio Perez, an engineering major, take a ride in Lot 10 on May 2.

By Xavier Johnson, Assistant Sports Editor

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Often times students take night classes to accommodate a busy work schedule, parenting duties or both.

Safety for night students is a concern on campus.

During the winter the sun goes down as early as 5 p.m. and in spring and summer it becomes dark around 8 p.m.

With night classes running past 9 p.m., it is inevitable that these students will be leaving class after it is dark.

Political science major Xenia Rivera said she doesn’t feel safe going to and leaving her Introduction to Macroeconomics Principles class on Mondays from 6:40 to 9:30 p.m.

“I only feel safe going to class or leaving if my boyfriend is with me,” Rivera said.

She said the main concern for her is the lack of good lighting near the Liberal Arts and Physical Sciences buildings.

“Anything could happen at night. I don’t really see campus police around at night. That makes me feel uneasy,” Rivera said.

Corporal Tom Holt said Police Services officers and police aides are making their rounds at night.

He said they provide students with escorts as well as a consistent patrol around campus.

For non-emergencies students can call the Police Services general number 510-236-2820 to be connected right to a Police Services dispatcher.

Students with emergencies can call the campus emergency line at 510-235-7800 or dial 911.

When dialing 911, Richmond consolidated dispatch receives the call.

Richmond Police will contact CCC officers, Holt said.

Concerns have been addressed recently with the LED lights installed near the Student Services Center.

Student safety remains a concern for some students.

Holt said he would like to see lighting improved on campus and more cameras  installed.

Specifically, he said he would like to see more lighting on upper Campus Drive.

Milca Baires, a political science major, said when she took night classes she felt unsafe when having to walk while it was dark.

“If I’m attacked at night it is hard to receive help. I probably won’t remember Police Service’s number to call them,” Baires said. She said she wishes there were emergency buttons around campus for students to press when in distress.

Baires is not the only student to bring up the idea of emergency buttons.

Melissa Chavez, nursing major, said her safety is not an issue since she is usually with friends but understands how other students do.

She said installing emergency buttons around campus would be a good idea. “It is just extra assurance, you know. It would be a good idea if it is possible,” Chavez said.

Nursing major Sana Khan said she does not feel safe at all when on campus at night.

She said she walks cautiously around campus when exiting her night class and feels like she doesn’t see Police Services officers often enough at night.

Holt said students should have the Police Services numbers on speed dial in their cell phones in order to quickly contact Police Services when needed.

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